The Sliding Scale Of Asset Protection

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Asset Protection

The Sliding Scale of Asset Protection
The most common misconception among Doctors regarding asset protection is the idea that an asset is either “protected” or “unprotected.” This “black or white” analysis is no more accurate in the field of asset protection than it is in the field of medicine. In fact, asset protection advisors are very similar to physicians in how they approach any client or patient. In this chapter, we will discuss the way in which advisors measure a client’s assets by using a sliding scale. Then we will suggest ways in which Doctors can protect assets, avoid high-risk assets and achieve a high level of protection.

The Sliding Scale And ScoresAsset Protection
To measure the assets of a client, advisors use a sliding scale that indicates the client’s “good” and “bad” financial habits. Like Doctors, asset protection professionals will first try to get a client to avoid “bad habits.” For a medical patient, bad habits might mean smoking, drinking too much or maintaining a poor diet. For a client of ours, bad habits might include owning property in their own name, owning property jointly with a spouse or failing to maximize the percentage of exempt assets in an investment portfolio.
Like a Doctor who judges the severity of a patient’s illness, asset protection specialists use a rating system to determine the protection or vulnerability of a client’s particular asset. The sliding scale runs from-5 (totally vulnerable) to +5 (superior protection). As you have probably already guessed, our goal is to bring a client’s score closer to (+5) for each of their assets.
When most clients initially come to see us, their asset planning scores are overwhelmingly on the negative side of the scale. The reason for this score varies. Typically, personal assets are owned jointly (-3) or in their individual name (-5). Both of these ownership forms provide little protection from lawsuits and may also have negative tax and estate planning implications. More

Avoiding Healthcare & Insurance Issues

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Avoiding Healthcare & Insurance Issues
Before we can show you how to turn your practice into a Fortress and an Engine in the next Lesson, we have to show you what to avoid in your practice so that you don’t cause any insurmountable financial damage to yourself or your practice. In addition to personal lawsuits, Doc-tors need to worry about business issues as well. This is consistent with our previous discussions about the “business of medicine.”
Many physicians have a false sense of security and believe that malpractice insurance will protect them from lawsuits. We agree with you that a medical malpractice claim is not “likely” to result in a significant depletion of your estate. However, if you go to trial and lose, you could be in serious financial trouble. According to Current Award Trends in Personal Injury (Copyright 2007), half of all jury awards for medical malpractice claims in 2005 exceeded $1,184,000. The average medical malpractice jury award in 2005 was $3,830,000. If you consider that most doctors carry $1 million of per occurrence medical malpractice liability insurance, half the doctors who lose a judgment will be out at least $200,000 and the average personal loss from a judgment will exceed $2.8 million of the doctor’s own money (after insurance has paid its limits).
In addition to medical malpractice threats, there are unexpected risks that carry an even higher likelihood of causing asset depletion. As a Doctor, business issues include liability for your business as well as liability that may result from regulatory issues and administrative investigations (i.e., OPMC, HCFA, Stark, HIPAA, OIG, etc.) and contract issues (i.e., Medicare Medicaid Fraud investigations, over-billing claims, and refund audits from insurance companies). These types of claims are increasingly overshadowing the threat of medical malpractice because, unlike malpractice risks, they are usually not covered by insurance, leaving the physician to privately fund the defense costs out of pocket. In addition, mistakes in regulatory issues can even land a Doctor in jail. No other risks in this book carry such a serious threat.
In this chapter, we will discuss some of the specific healthcare and insurance related risks, explain how they can be avoided, and offer suggestions on how to protect yourself from mistakes that may occur even when you do your best to avoid them.

Employee at Mac ComputerHIPAA
The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 was originally en-acted to enhance (not guarantee) certain health care insurance coverage for Americans. HIPAA also creates a national, standardized set of rules for maintaining (security) and protecting (confi-dential) patient medical information known as PHI (Protected Health Information). The failure to institute a good faith and reasonable office compliance program, to provide privacy notice to patients concerning their rights, to protect against the unauthorized release of confidential records and implement security safeguards for data in transit and maintained in the office could potentially place physician owners, their employees (including administrative office staff) and even business associates at grave risk for monetary fines and even criminal penalties for the unauthorized disclosure of PHI which is enforced by the OCR. Such penalties and sanctions could include civil penalties and fines for each violation ($100 per violation with a maximum penalty of $25,000/year for identical penalties) and for intentional violations of the law could even include criminal penalties (i.e. fines between $50,000—$250,000 and imprisonment terms from 1 to 10 years).

Over-Billing Issues
A key operational element in the business of medicine is the process of billing, coding and collecting professional fees from insurance companies. In some cases the payers are insurance companies and in other cases, the payers may be Medicare or Medicaid. Aside from the United States tax code (which we will call the most complex system of rules in the history of mankind in Lesson #7), the Medicare coding system may be the most complex system of rules ever created.
Despite best efforts to train administrative staff, medical offices are regularly audited by insurance companies, Medicare and Medicaid. These audits routinely result in claims of over-billing. Many Doctors fight a losing battle against the large insurance companies (and their teams of attorneys) and ultimately have to surrender funds they previously collected for services rendered. Unfortunately, when the audit comes from Medicare or Medicaid, Doctors have more to lose than just money. A Doctor found guilty of Medicare fraud can actually go to jail. Because of the significant costs resulting from both Medicare fraud and commercial insurance carrier audits, we will examine them both separately.

Medicare Fraud
Anyone who provides, or receives, healthcare services, could commit Medicare fraud. Fraud is defined as an intentional deception or misrepresentation that someone makes, knowing it is false, that could result in the payment of some unauthorized benefit. Abuse, on the other hand, involves actions that are inconsistent with sound medical, business, or fiscal practices. Abuse di-rectly or indirectly results in higher costs to the Medicare program through improper payments that are not medically necessary. In the eyes of investigators, fraud and abuse both have the same effect. They steal valuable resources from the Medicare Trust Fund that would otherwise be used to provide benefits to Medicare recipients.

Fraud Investigations
The federal law enforcement agency responsible for investigating Medicare fraud is the Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General (HHS-OIG). In some cases, HHS-OIG may involve other agencies, such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), or the Postal Inspection Service.
Many complaints are simply misunderstandings or billing errors and can be resolved fairly easily. Some complaints help identify abusive billing practices. The Medicare contractor will educate the health care provider, collect any overpayment, and then follow up to make sure the provider does not make the same mistake again. Other complaints involve Medicare fraud. These cases often require long, complex investigations by federal law enforcement agencies.

Penalties
The U.S. Attorney General’s office targets health care providers for civil and/or criminal prosecution. Some of the penalties for someone convicted of Medicare fraud are listed More